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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
suppression. our next guest defense the tough voter id law say it is a paramount important that we protect the integrity of the process and make sure voter irregularities and voter fraud is eliminating. joining us now, attorney general of south carolina, great to have you with us.at first, your reaction to what the first lady had to sy. >> i obviously disagree with the first lady.with in every state i looked at, georgia, indiana are two states, section five, one is not a section five states. when they have had laws with a federal id for theoter registration card actually minority that is a went up in subsequent elections and participation.s. lou: when you talk about the five states, those are states because of civil rights transgressions 60 years ago, 50 years ago, they still remain under the watchful eye of the justice department for a revision in their electoral laws or procedures, right?pro >> absolutely. states have asked the federal government permission before they can implement a law thathe affects elections, but in a state passing a law, that she, went up in a state of georgia, up
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
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. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his lif
lawmakers seemed close to becoming law until jeanne boehner walked away from the deal and tried to yankee laterally pass his own bill which he called, somewhat weirdly, plan b, to raise taxes on over 100 million and suspend all leeming cuts. that plan blew up in boehner's face, however, when he couldn't get enough votes from his own caucus to pass it. here's boehner, the day after pulling the bill from the floor. >> because of the political divide in the country, because of the divide here in washington, trying to bridge these differences has been difficult. while we may have not been able to get the votes last night, to avert 99.81% of the tax increases, i don't think -- they weren't taking that out on me. they were dealing with the perception that somebody might accuse them of raising taxes. >> probably because he's asking them to vote for raising taxes. later on friday, president obama reiterated he wants to reach a broad compromise to cut the deficit so social security cuts remain on the table but in the mean time, the president proposed his own plan b, to extend the bush tax cuts on
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized to law over the next couple of years. we keep hearing those on the conservative side or republicans raise concerns about what we'll do for the country. what is your view. now you're not part profit excess. you can speak more freely. is it going to be a good thing for the country? >> yes, it will. for one reason, as an example, right now we have 50 some billion dollars a year of uncompensated care. that means people don't have insurance don't have medicaid, medicare or private insurance, don't have military coverage or anything like that, so they are not insured. they have access to health care in the emergency rooms. if they taken in and can't pay and don't go through a bankruptcy or something like that, that costs that care doesn't just go away. it's shifted over to the rest of the us who have insurance. that's $50 billion. now, you stop and think about that it could be as much as $1500 per person who pay for those who don't. when you have everybody in the system, all insured one way or another, that uncompensated care goes away
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)